Sunday, October 28, 2007

Washington Through My Eyes


I arrived home from Washington D.C. today, and while I missed my hubby and my puppums, I am completely infatuated with our nation's capital and can't wait to go back. My three days in D.C. were spent touring the inside of the White House (a truly overwhelming experience), The National Museum of Art, The Smithsonian, The Lincoln Memorial, The Washington Memorial, and Jefferson Memorial.


My three nights in D.C. were spent at restaurants, bars, and jazz clubs sipping wine and discussing religion and politics (my two favs.) with my fellow Christian gal pal, my atheist professor, and agnostic student advisor.

While New York City will always remain the Mecca of American cities, D.C. has taken up residence in my heart. I love how the entire city radiates history. The monuments and buildings are truly majestic and most of the museums and historical attractions are F-R-E-E, so that's always a plus.

I loved every moment of this trip, the trekking through the city, the sight seeing, the tours, the vast amount of historical information absorbed, and the great fun and conversation exchanged with the group I was with.

One moment during the trip particularly stuck out in my mind. I was walking with my friend between the reflecting pools and the Washington Monument and the pathway was PACKED with busy preoccupied people hurrying along their way. We, too, were rushing to fit everything into our short trip. While my friend stopped to fix the settings on her camera, a small object on the ground caught my eye as people unknowingly kicked it back and forth. When it landed on the side of the path this is what I saw....


I watched person after person obliviously shuffle this beautiful little lost cross further down the path, splashing water on it from their shoes, almost crushing it. Seeing this tiny cross kicked to the side of the road next to sopping wet dead grass and a pile of mud made me think of the still small voice that is always speaking, but rarely heard, or the presence that is always there but remains unknown to so many. Just a small moment that spoke volumes to me.
Anyway, the Washington D.C. was phenomenal and I can't wait to go back!

18 comments:

Cassidy M. said...

Do you think frequenting bars and clubs with unbelievers while publicly drinking alcohol is acceptable because you discussed "religion" while doing it? A bad behavorial witness will always cancel out whatever "religious" words you spoke to unbelievers.

from Christy Fritz said...

i am so glad you had a great time with your friends. i have only been twice...and actually having seen london first, it made me appreciate it's newness and uniqueness even more, when i finally made it to dc. it is anamazing place. my good friend is the education director at the american history museum and gave me the tour.:)

catrina said...

I did not see mention of the Holocaust Museum, how could you go and not see it? I wanted to agonize over it with you my dark friend. Oh well next time.

Tia Lynn said...

Catrina, I KNOW! Me and my other dark friend wanted to go, but it was closed the one day that we had free time to do it! Next time is right!

Oh and Cassidy, you make me very, very tired.

Marissa said...

Tia, didnt you know that drinking wine is the fastest pathway to hell? I mean, really...blasphemy against the Holy Spirit isnt the only unforgivable sin. Drinking wine is also! You should really start trying to be as holy as the rest of us Tia. Im disappointed in you

Ma said...

#2 did you meet with the Sojourners???
do tell, do tell !
i'm soo excited for you!

Cassidy, i soo know where you are coming from, but if you can , remember that it's going somewhere you know is a weakness for you is leaving yourself open to sin. But if not, and it does not get in the way of what you are called to do, then fear for it's own sake is also a sin. There is a great freedom in Christ which is not a license to sin but also removes a lot of cages and frees you up to some places where you can meet the unsaved who would never ever enter a church to hear the Gospel.
I understand, be in but not of the World. Be set apart..... Jesus ate and drank with tax collectors and harlots. BIG stumbler for the religiousright of the day. But He had a larger agenda then outward appearance.
Do you recall this scripture ??
Rom 14:1-3Accept him whose faith is weak, without passing judgment on disputable matters. 2One man's faith allows him to eat everything, but another man, whose faith is weak, eats only vegetables. 3The man who eats everything must not look down on him who does not, and the man who does not eat everything must not condemn the man who does, for God has accepted him.

Tia Lynn said...

How I miss my marissa! You make me laugh! Love ya.

Ma, I did stop by the office, but it was saturday and it was closed. But it is on such a cool part of D.C., it would be amazing....

Anonymous said...

Not to be a stickler, but you advertising that you were out at bars drinking wine is causing Cassidy M. (and probably a lot of your other readers) to stumble. That is strickly forbidden. So, even if you are ok with drinking in public, you are still in sin because others object to it.

musicmommy3 said...

I sooooo hate to make this discussion about alcohol; because, I think your point was to let us know that you had a GREAT time in D.C. BUT...I almost cannot stop myself...

Anon, where in the Bible is drinking "stricktly forbidden"? Please give me an actual verse because the ones I remember talk about not being drunk. Nowhere in this blog does Tia say that she was drunk. All it states is that she was hanging out with friends and drinking wine while chatting. I know MANY very godly people who drink and don't ever get drunk.
Plus, I don't think that Cassidy is in any danger of stumbling. I seriously doubt that she will be at a bar anytime in the near future because "Tia does it." She made her point very clearly.

Sorry if I overstepped Tia. I know it's your blog not mine but some things just get under my skin and I cannot keep quiet. :)

Anyway, let's stick to the point of this post. Glad that you had fun in D.C. I've been there once, when I was 13, but I still remember some things. It was really a great place to visit. Hope to go there again sometime.
Love, Angela :)

Anonymous said...

It’s not about the act of consuming alcohol as being “sin”-although it is unwise and a bit immature, it’s about causing believers who have convictions about drinking and being in bars to be offended and/or stumbled. THAT is what is strictly forbidden, offending and stumbling. On top of offending other christians, how seriously do you think the unsaved Tia was with will consider her faith after drinking with her and partying in bars night after night? What sets her apart from them if she partakes in all the same activities? Nothing, and there in lies the problem. Christian “freedom” is given to us, only so we can sacrifice it back to God.

Tia, if you must drink, do it in the privacy of your own home, not among the unsaved or advertised on your blog, if you really want to abide in a biblical witness.

Tia Lynn said...

And here I thought I was posting a non-controversial personal post that would simply share my good time in D.C. I did not intend this post to turn into some debate on alcohol (although I’d put one together if you’d like!) but just for the record...The people I was with were not alcoholics or offended my drinking (in moderation I might add). If I was physically with people who were offended or struggling with alcohol addiction, I would absolutely abstain. It’s funny Anon that you mention being “set apart.” While we were walking the street of D.C. there was a street preacher standing on platform yelling at strangers walking by, condemning all sorts of practices without ever once engaging anyone. He sure was “set apart,” so much so that he never listened, related with people, or really loved people. I’ve known my two professors for three years and have built solid relationships with them. They have been burned bad by religion and are turned off by most public Christian figures. However, because I have invested time in them and have been honest with them about my real life, (including my comfort with drinking from time to time in moderation) and have been committed to not deceiving them with some contrived “Christian persona,” we actually can share some great exchanges about Jesus, what it means to be a Christian, and how no matter what they conclude, I will still love them. My one professor said he did not know there were any Christians that would stay in the same room with him after learning his political and religious views and how deeply it touched him that my faith did not drive me cast him out, but to embrace him. I do not claim to be “holy,” Lord knows I have issues, but make no mistake hanging in D.C. bars, sipping wine, and engaging in a TWO-WAY conversations did indeed set me apart from the stereotypical hypocritical Christians that my professors have unfortunately encountered.

Tia Lynn said...

Oh Angela, you did not cross the line. The other view needs to be represented so the silent readers know that not all christians are legalistic loons. :) Love ya!

musicmommy3 said...

"It’s not about the act of consuming alcohol as being “sin”-although it is unwise and a bit immature, it’s about causing believers who have convictions about drinking and being in bars to be offended and/or stumbled. THAT is what is strictly forbidden, offending and stumbling."


Thanks anon. I see where you are coming from a bit clearer now. That said, I still respectfully have to disagree, in part,with what you are trying to say.

On one hand I agree with you where you are saying that we should look different from the world.
On the other hand I have to totally disagree where you used the word offend.
That word is not used in either of the translations I have. The words used in mine were- distressed and grieved. I went back and read the context to Paul's exhortation and noticed some things I've never noticed before. Most of this chapter was talking about not judging each other's behavior. Also, it was pointing out to "make every effort to do what leads to peace and to mutual edification." If any person was truly "stumbling" or "grieved" by Tia's drinking they should approach her and let her know. Obviously, those who were with her were not. Tia would NOT drink in a situation that would hurt another believer. If you are simply offended that she drank then that's really your problem. If you are grieved about it- tell her in a respectful way. Don't sit and judge what she obviously feels freedom to do. It's not like she was stripping naked and table dancing. That would obviously be over the line. LOL
Let's be careful what we say to others who have freedom in areas like alcohol. She was not drunk. That would have clearly been over the line. Her non-believing friends were not offended. They were not turned off by her behavior. I'm assuming they were turned on by her love, honesty, and sincerity.
I'm all for thinking of others first and in a lot of situations that means not doing things like drinking. BUT, let's not use this as an opportunity to pass judgement on someone. If you're offended pray about it. If you're truly concered about Tia's witness (because you care about her and care about Jesus being upheld) then tell her in a private email. Talk with her about it. Don't just write a judgemental comment and be done with it.

OK I'm finished. Sorry, anon. I'm really not mad. I just hate to see us all arguing and being judgmental about things that can be a bit trivial. MAybe not trivial to you. Take a stand then. Just do it with kindness, love, and respect. Blessings to all you who disagree. Keep standing firm for Christ.

from Christy Fritz said...

tia, i wonder if you remember the bit in messy spirituality, when three ministers go to see a greek orthodox priest on a missions trip and he offers them fine wine. two of them flat out refused saying proudly that they did not drink. the third accepted, and drank it happily. on the way home the other two expressed how shocked they were that the president of the very conservative denomination...DRANK!!! he quietly replied, "actually i don't drink, but someone had to act like a christian!" :) i thought...how true. i don't mean to keep this going, just liked that story.

Tia Lynn said...

I liked that story in the book to. It's fine. Cassidy M. apparently likes to stop by and throw comment bombs. :) No biggie!

Tam said...

Wow - the found cross on the sidewalk is very sobering. the way you describe the passer byers speaks so much truth!

Tam said...

Ummmm, unfortunately i posted my comment before i read any of the others. I meant NOTHING by using the word "sobering". ;)

Tia, I have a feeling you're not worried one bit about the opinions of others and feel fine about drinking in moderation with like-minded people who obviously agreed to said outing. I really don't see the problem.

I do know the bible talks of not serving meat to a guest that doesn't eat meat. So you wouldn't offer an alcoholic a drink or invite them for a night out at the club. which you didn't seem to do.

Sometimes people get on a self-righteous soapbox and more often than not THAT is more offensive and a turn off.

Why fellow believers nit pik each other over non-essentials will never make sense to me...

Sorry, I think I've only ever commented once here and now I go write a book!

I'm glad you had a good trip!

Tia Lynn said...

Well thanks Tam! Very kind and true words! Feel welcomed to weigh in more often sister.